Makings of Sankofa

Ravenne. 20. University of Florida.
Instagram: ravee_xo


Reblogged from talented10th

Reblogged from africandiasporaphd
africandiasporaphd:

The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence.Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery’s end—and created a culture that sustains America’s deepest dreams of freedom.

africandiasporaphd:

The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation’s original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America’s later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. 

As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence.

Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery’s end—and created a culture that sustains America’s deepest dreams of freedom.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Reblogged from curvesincolor
Reblogged from hueyfreemanonlyspeaksthetruth
shanellbklyn:

BEEN RELEVANT SINCE THEY FIRST TOUCHED AFRICAN SOIL.

shanellbklyn:

BEEN RELEVANT SINCE THEY FIRST TOUCHED AFRICAN SOIL.

(via susiethemoderator)

Reblogged from devoutfashion

devoutfashion:

She by Bena - Skittles Collection Lookbook – September 2014

(via live-n-prosper)

Reblogged from sizvideos
Reblogged from daughterofzami

moniabadir:

daughterofzami:

Gil Scott Heron, RIP

Him.

(via black-culture)

Reblogged from lookdifferentmtv

blackfashion:

pallet-town-julie-brown:

kudos to mtv for spreading this message tho

Turn the fuck up MTV

(Source: lookdifferentmtv, via black-culture)

Reblogged from ollebosse

(Source: ollebosse, via goodkhama)

Reblogged from sancophaleague

sancophaleague:

The “conscious” community hates rappers but why? In reality many (not all) of them are just average kids who come in poor black neighborhoods who happen to get a deal from some white man looking to make money off them. Yes, their mentality is self-destruction, self-hating, and black community destructive. The PERFECT  qualities that these industries look for when they want to give a deal. You think some poor black kid who is looking for a way out is going to pass up a chance to be a famous and be rich in capitalistic society such as this?  

What’s my point? Redirect your anger towards rappers to the industries that put them there. Look at “Bobby Shmurda”  2 months ago he nobody knew who he was. He drops one track about shooting/drug selling and it’s national hit being played on the radio everywhere. You gonna hate bobby for not speaking on black issues? These dudes are ignorant because of the environment they come from and “getting money” doesn’t change that. Having money doesn’t mean they “know thy self”.
Music Industry, The School system, and the Prison system all linked. 
I’m not saying don’t hold rapper accountable but when you are attacking them always keep in mind it’s bigger than music. Peace!
Post Written by @solar_innerg
#sancophaleague